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The Perfect Omega Ratio

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By Jennifer Lynn December 5, 2012 Leave a comment Go to comments

Fats play an important role in our health, especially the good ones! The three basic types of fats are monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and saturated. The omega-3 and omega-6 fats are polyunsaturated.

The omega-6 fatty acid (linoleic acid) is plentiful in both nature and diet but this is not the case with omega-3. Walnuts, flaxseed and spinach are a poor source of heart-healthy omega-3 because these foods don’t provide any of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, also known as EPA and DHA.

The Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, a unit of the University of Southern Mississippi‘s College of Science and Technology, refers to this dietary fat balance as having “resulted in an overwhelming surplus of omega-6 fatty acids and a deficiency in omega-3 fatty acids.” They estimate the balance of polyunsaturated fats in the Western diet as having at least 20 times more omega-6 then it should. This dietary imbalance is thought to contribute to heart disease, cancer, diabetes and other inflammatory diseases.

Fast food, including such processed foods like cakes, crackers, pies and all deep-fried foods, are one reason why there is too much omega-6 in the diet. Omega-6 oils (vegetable, corn, soybean, sesame, safflower, sunflower and cottonseed oils) provide the texture and taste that Americans enjoy. However, the typical American diet is causing a dietary fat imbalance.

Omega-3 is needed by every cell in the body! As the number of double bonds increases, so does fluidity, so highly unsaturated, long-chain omega-3 fatty acids are essential for healthy, flexible cells.

Only certain types of fish provide a significant source of the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA. The healthiest fish are extremely expensive, which limits how often they are consumed. The long-chain omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are found predominantly in marine life: fish, calamari, seafood and algae. EPA and DHA reduce inflammation and improve cardiovascular health.

The Fats Handbook explains it best: “The omega-3-produced eicosanoids elicit anti-inflammatory responses while omega-6 eicosanoids elicit inflammatory responses. When the diet contains high concentrations of omega-6 fatty acids, cell membranes have high concentrations of omega-6, and the highly potent eicosanoids that are produced by the omega-6 precursor, arachidonic acid, are released.”

You need to supplement the diet with fish oil to help restore the dietary balance of fats to the optimal ratio. Fish oils contain the long-chain omega-3 EPA and DHA, but not all fish oils are equal!

Some fish oils are not concentrated. Don’t be fooled by the word concentrate like “fish-oil concentrate.” Look for EPA and DHA levels listed on the label. Also, it is important to make sure it is only a pure, omega-3 supplement; we get enough omega-6 in the diet!

Res-Q 1250 is a  highly concentrated EPA/DHA supplement that promotes optimal cardiovascular health and helps to reduce inflammation.  It is something that everyone needs. Since Res-Q 1250 is at least twice as potent as most fish oils, it represents an exceptional savings.

To contact us by telephone, call 1-800-262-5483.

References:

Types of Dietary Fats and Oils

Fats HandBook

Posted in: The Res-Q Blog Tags: DHAEPAinflammation
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